It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia – Season 1, Episode 6: The Gang Finds a Dead Guy

It has been a while since I watched an episode of It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia and I feel it might take a few more episodes to get myself back into the gist of the series. Recently on my spare time I’ve been re-watching the Friends seasons all over again so it is a big difference between the two types of television comedies. I feel It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia has it’s own category, whereas a show like Friends is a sitcom family comedy, and a show like The Office is a mockumentary/situation comedy. It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia uses that dry sense of humor, where to some people it may not be funny on screen, but if you picture the situations happening to your personal life with your friends, than it is hysterical.

The gang never seems to have a quiet relaxing day at the bar, and this episode does not disappoint. Even though I am still anticipating the arrival or Danny DeVito in season two, the cast is still able to succeed without him. Each episode the audience is able to see the bond between the cast strengthening and their comedic skills becoming stronger and funnier.

The episode starts off with Dea and Mac opening up the bar when the realize that Charlie closed up last night and left an old man ‘sleeping’ at one of the booths. Mac decides to poke the old man with a billiards stick to wake him up. Besides the fact that the title of the episode gave it away, I was able to tell that the old man was dead rather than sleeping. No human being with an ounce of self respect sleeps at an empty and closed bar for an entire night and continuing into the next afternoon. The whole time Mac was poking the old man I kept picturing the directors allowing the stick to penetrate into the mans rib cage. Especially after Dea told Mac to poke him harder in his rib cage. Snapping back to reality, I was able to realize that a scene like that would be too gruesome for sitcom series. After the old mans body toppled over onto the booth, Mac looks at Dea and say “Holy shit! That bitch is dead.” I found that line funny given the circumstances. It also helps prove my theory about how the gang has no remorse for anybody or anything. The scene switches to the ambulance taking away the body and a happy melody plays. I found it funny how even though someone just died, the back round music plays a happy tune as if nothing happened. An attractive woman enters the bar and claims to be the old mans distant granddaughter and would like to get a better sense of who her grandfather was. Charlie and Mac begin to fight over and this sparks a challenge between the two, to see who can win the girl.

As anyone who actually reads my blog may know, my favorite character so far is definitely Dea. Once again the guys mistreat her in this episode as well when she claims they should mourn because a person died in their bar. The guys respond by telling her to stop being so depressing. Even though Dennis is Dea’s twin brother, Charlie and Mac treat her as their sister as well. They treat her the way Dennis treats her, and she has just become use to it by now. This episode was especially funny because Dea had her own story. After seeing the dead guy, Dea decided to visit her own grandfather at his nursing home. Charlie comes along since Dennis does not want to visit his “asshole” grandfather. It is revealed that Dea has a strong fear of old people. They creep her out, especially their old hands because you can “see right through them, and all their inside business”. Dea does care for people more than the rest of the gang, however her selfishness is also visible when she refuses to actually go into her grandfathers room. The reason why Dea didn’t enter the room was because when she saw him, she was once again scared and claimed “he doesn’t even look like a real person”. One of my favorite scenes was when Dea was in the nursing home bathroom washing her face and she turned around to see a malnourished old woman starring at her. This freaked Dea out and she screamed at the top of her lungs. At the end of the episode when Dea actually entered her grandfathers room, I thought she was almost overcoming her fear but when her grandfather started to put his hands on her face and his fingers in her mouth, she ran out of the room and vomited.

I also want to point out how I feel most of the extra’s and minor characters in the show are all oblivious to the way the gang acts and how they treat one another. Mac and Dennis were clearly lying to the dead old mans granddaughter just so they can sleep with her, but she was not able to even realize this. Also at the old mans wake, Dennis made some elaborate fake story about how he and the old man use to go down to the homeless shelter and feed the poor and wash their feet. Rather than these minor characters confronting him, they believed him and were astonished by his good deed.

When Charlie went to go visit Dea and Dennis’ grandfather, he confused Charlie as Dennis and told him to go to an old storage facility to retrieve some of his old war paraphernalia. It turns out that Dea and Dennis’ grandfather was a former Nazi. Mac and Charlie idiotically think that this is amazing and that they should sell it to a museum and they feel they will make a bunch of money. The end result is that it is illegal and the two decided to burn the box without telling Dea or Dennis. When Charlie told Mac that it was an emergency and he had to show him something, I had no clue that i was going to be a Nazi uniform. My jaw literally dropped while I was watching the episode. I felt bad and morally wrong just from watching, yet Charlie and Mac felt no shame. Most of the gang never feel remorseful or shameful, with the few exceptions of Dea.

I watched this episode alone in my room on a Thursday afternoon. I would give this episode a 4.5 out of 5 rating, because the Nazi storyline surprised me and I was happy that Dea was able to have her own little story.

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